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105347 No. 105347
#Discussion
Pic is kinda related?

Hello, all. I've been writing fanfics for about two and a half months now, and I've learned a lot about not only writing as a craft, but also as a hobby, if that makes sense. While I only consider myself a slightly above average writer at best, I'm hoping what I've learned will help others who are struggling to find their way as an author.

I've gone through some rough patches. There have been times away from the keyboard where I've had too much time to think, and I almost decided to give up. In fact, a couple times I DID give up, only to be drawn right back to the keyboard a couple hours later. Either I truly do love writing, or I just love to torture myself.

-Besides the number one rule, which is KEEP WRITING, I'd say the most important thing I've discovered is do not compare yourself to anyone else. The moment you start kicking yourself for not being good as some of the better writers in the fandom, you have lost. You won't be able to focus on your own writing, only how it isn't the best. At times, I've been heavily discouraged from the simple thought of "I'll never be as good as SSnE, or device heretic, or Absolute Anonymous, etc." Do not do this to yourself. No writer is going to get as good as them overnight, or even within a few months. The only thing you can do is keep writing, get constructive feedback, and keep improving. If you can't shake the jealousy, then channel this jealousy into passion to get better. Don't ignore the works of better authors just because you're jealous. Instead, try to thank these people for crafting such fine works that you can learn from. Bottom line: enjoy the writing of others, but never let it detract you from your own writing and ideas.

-Patience is extremely important. Again, I've irrationally kicked myself for not having written a super cool epic yet. But you know what? These things take time. Of course I'm not going to have written an awesome novel length story in just a couple months. Like any other craft, improving your writing ability takes time. You have to be in it for the long haul if you want to be one of the best.

-Ditch all notions of perfection, or even greatness, especially on the first draft. There was a short time where I could barely write anything because *channels Twilight Sparkle* everything had to be PERFECT. This is unrealistic. First drafts are usually going to be clunky, maybe even bad. So always keep this in mind when you write. There's always time to go back afterwards and make revisions. Also, no one's writing is perfect, even after a billion revisions.

-Don't let writing burn you out. I'm a bit guilty of not following my own advice here. My own writing, as well as my own shortcomings, is pretty much all I think about, and I'm trying to remedy that. Yes, it is sometimes a good idea to try to force yourself to write when you're not fully in the mood just for practice, but if you find yourself in a nervous wreck over your writing, take a break. Find something to make you laugh. I've found that just a little laughter can clear your mind right up (Pinkie Pie would be proud!). Writing is supposed to be fun, not stressful.

-Read. You can draw a lot from the best works out there. Like I implied above, I sometimes find it tough to read the works of better authors because I can only focus on how I'm not as good as them, not on the actual story. As I said, get over this as soon as you can. From reading, you'll run into new ideas and good writing style (or not good writing style, if you're reading something bad, hehe).

-Write. Write, write, write. Yes, you have heard this approximately one billion times before, yet it still bears repeating. You can brainstorm and outline all you want, but it means nothing until you put the words down. Following through and executing your ideas is what really counts.

Whew. I think that's it for now. I hope the advice I gave actually helps, and doesn't fall completely flat. These are just my observations on the subject from my time writing.
Unspoiler all text  • Expand all images  • Reveal spoilers
>> No. 105350
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105350
A writer encouragement thread, well this is new,,it's a shame there's no perfect tag for this. In any case, this warms my heart, I commend you.
>> No. 105351
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105351
>do not compare yourself to anyone else.
I'd have to disagree (TL;DR the rest of the post cause laziness)

You HAVE to compare. If you don't compare you have no idea where you're going. How can you tell that you've improved if you have nothing to compare yourself to? It's like building a skyscraper, trying to get it to be the largest one ever, and not having another one around to tell how far you've actually gone compared to others. The fact that your building isn't as tall as other ones should give you a point of reference of where you want to be, and inspire you to reach that height.
>> No. 105357
>>105351

Hmm. Maybe I could have rephrased that better. Perhaps "Don't become obsessed with your shortcomings" would be better. Don't only focus on how your skyscraper isn't the tallest, without trying to build it up more. Basically, what I've thought before is "I'm not the best, so what's the point?" You have to keep trying and focusing on YOUR work, and not let the thought that you're not super awesome become a constant distraction. So yes, perhaps it is best to compare yourself to others, but not so much that you lose sight of your own writing.
>> No. 105362
I just wanted to add something.

Whenever you get down in the dumps from how much your writing sucks, try reading the first paragraph of 'The Spiderses'. Trust me, you'll feel a whole lot better,
>> No. 105367
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105367
I'm even newer than OP and barely average, but I have to agree with the majority of these.

Especially the "ditch all notions of perfection on the first draft". I word-dumped the first 20,000 of my fic Jewel of Reinsburg in a day. I did it just to get the story out of my head and on to paper. It was mostly crud but a good few chapters were diamonds in the rough and with a lot of edits (which are still ongoing!) it's gotten to a stage where I'm fairly happy with it.

With the "compare yourself to others". My personal view is that it's great to look at, review and learn from others, but comparing yourself to them is an easy way to feel disheartened or not good enough. If you can balance the two, you're going to benefit the most.

Anyway, great thread! I've found out most of these in the last few weeks as I've written, edited, submitted etc. :)
>> No. 105368
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105368
Ah, good thread, very, VERY good thread. I honestly hope this stays on the front page of /fic/ , so any and all newcomers can see this and get off to a good start. The entire paragraph about comparing yourself to others basically answered all of the problems I use to have with that exact same thing. Thanks for making this, you're awesome!

The problem now is finding the time to actually sit down, concentrate, and apply all of this.

>Pic is kinda related?
Pic is very related.
>> No. 105374
Definitely need to sticky this, or I'll just print it out on a little card and look at it every time I read something like http://www.fimfiction.net/blog/34715 (AKA, "Here's a bunch of stories more famous than yours").

But, a question: is it possible to keep writing and *not* improve? I'm always afraid that I'm going to get stubborn and say, "Hey, it's my style, deal with it" when I'm really just refusing to learn.
>> No. 105377
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105377
>>105374

Surely if you're afraid of that, it will stop it from happening? I'd say just stay open to criticism and keep that thought in your mind. Ask yourself; "Am I just being stubborn?" if you really dig your hooves into the ground after feedback.

I think it's pretty hard to do a lot of something and not improve, how much you improve depends on your capacity and willingness to learn and accept feedback. :)
>> No. 105393
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105393
Wow, this is actually some really useful advice, and it's immediately applicable. Thanks, Nick. :)
>> No. 105397
>>105362
Considering it was basically a pre-readers inside joke, it only makes me sad.
>> No. 105411
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105411
>>105397
Shush you! Secrets!
>> No. 105422
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105422
>>105347
>do not compare yourself to anyone else
I think of writing like golf. The point is not you versus the other guy. The point is you versus the course, and you versus yourself.

>There was a short time where I could barely write anything because *channels Twilight Sparkle* everything had to be PERFECT.
Oh sweet Celestia, this. I'm better than I used to be, but even nowadays, I occasionally find myself turning to "apple cider" for my writing sessions, just so I can turn my damn brain off and write.
>> No. 105425
>>105411
Wait... that was suppose to be secret? Cause I am not even all that old into the fandom and I know that. Others seem to also fit that bill, but no confirmation.
>> No. 105457
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105457
Very nice post. This about sums up all the issues that I've had trying to get motivated to finally sit down and start writing. In a way, it's good to know that there are always others who have been through/are still going through the same problems that I am.

I haven't actually written a full story yet, but pretty much all of what you said is true, especially the part about comparing yourself to others. It's so easy to get discouraged by the sheer brilliance of certain other authors instead of simply enjoying said brilliance and learning from it.

So thanks, this makes me feel more encouraged to stop whining and just get to writing :)
>> No. 105501
Okay, I just felt like I had to share this for inspiration.

Basically, my advice is a case of "Do as I say, not as I do." This evening, I was hit by a CRIPPLING wave of doubt and jealousy. I basically thought "what's the point of writing, it's so long and time consuming, and I'll never be able to write an awesome novel because I don't know all the intricacies of writing, and I don't know how to do anything right, etc."

As a result, I pretty much decided to give up. If the writing is going to be this stressful and consume all my thoughts, wouldn't it be better just to quit and be happy again?

Then, I talked to some people in the IRC chat, who gave me incredible moral support, and basically reiterated the very pieces of advice I'm telling you guys to follow. This, combined with receiving an email that my second EqD fic just got approved, gave me the confidence I needed to keep writing.

So, add one more thing to the list: no matter how hard you try, there will be rough patches of doubt, but never, ever give up. Keep pushing on, and keep writing.
>> No. 105505
Another thing that occurs to me is that this is why I write a weekly serial. It forces me to write to a schedule, and I know I've got a few people out there who are always going to read and respond, giving me that extra impetus every week.

As I wrote about in one of my stories, writers are changelings. We need love to survive.
>> No. 105506
Another thing that occurs to me is that this is why I write a weekly serial. It forces me to write to a schedule, and I know I've got a few people out there who are always going to read and respond, giving me that extra impetus every week.

As I wrote about in one of my stories, writers are changelings. We need love to survive.
>> No. 105525
Problem is, most books are crap these days. I know that I've just given up all hope on reading a good book without grammatical errors or bad storytelling.

I've been writing for... what? Almost eleven years now, since I learned how to read and write (though my handwriting was awful and still kind of is) and throughout those years, I've had people praising me to no end. Whenever they read my writing they say I'm extremely talented and everyone keeps telling me to write a book. Sometimes, I am tempted, because of so many rubbish (that word doesn't do justice, I just can't think of any others right now because I have a headache) books that are out. I feel like just writing one for the sake of letting people know what reading a good book is like.

It's the same for fanfiction. Most stories out there are alright, yeah. Still, they have some flaws in them. Most stories do, unless you are some sort of superhuman programmed to not make mistakes which is kind of impossible and frankly, I don't believe science has moved that far yet.

As for the "keep writing" tip, I find myself a bit iffy on this. Even if you do love writing, you'll eventually come to a point where the stuff you wrote makes you want to throw up. That's because you're forcing yourself to do it. I'm not saying that you're supposed to write whenever you feel like it, because God only knows when that'll be, but don't force yourself to keep to a strict schedule, otherwise you'll burn out, as you say.

It's a tricky business, writing, and only few can be good at it—but that isn't to say that you can't try. Heck, even the worst of writers, if they have enough hope and patience, not forgetting fuel, can become the greatest one day.

I may sound a bit narcissistic, and I sort of am, but... well, I can't think of anything to end this with without sounding like I'm blowing my own trumpet, heh.

So yeah, these things work for me, but to each their own. You have to actively find which writing style suits you most, but before that you have to learn all about grammar and such. If you don't know about something, then learn it. You've basically got a whole world of information at your fingertips, so why not use it?
>> No. 105526
>>105525
Oh, yeah, that was the other thing. Those awful books and other stories that I've read have effectively helped me become a better writer, by showing me what not to do. So they can be alright too.
>> No. 105544
And here's another piece of advice. If, like me, you do most of your work on offline programs (not GoogleDocs or Fimfiction or such). . . SAVE OFTEN!

I lost the better part of an outline. :(
>> No. 105552
I'm usually a lurker on Ponychan, but there's this one piece of advice an Anon said a while ago that's so great I could never forget it. I feel as though it's a necessity to share.

"The meaning you infused into a story is a pointless exercise; just write what you feel is right for the story and let the crowd try to give meaning to the fact there was a crow in the scene, despite the fact you simply liked the bird."
>> No. 105563
>>105552
Sounds like the Samurai. There was a copypasta with a bunch of stuff he has said, what happened to it?
>> No. 105564
Alright, another nugget of wisdom that probably everyone knows.

Stress kills productivity and creativity. Right now I'm in the middle of reading Eternal, and I found my mind flourishing with some ideas. But when I started letting my mind wander to the thoughts of "my story is nowhere near this good, and I don't know if I'll ever be able to write nearly this good, etc," all my creativity and desire to learn instantly shut off. So it bears repeating: get over doubt and stress as soon as you can, and then you'll be able to write with a clear mind.
>> No. 105705
>>105564

>I started letting my mind wander to the thoughts of "my story is nowhere near this good, and I don't know if I'll ever be able to write nearly this good, etc,"

This happens to me a lot. It's happened so much that I haven't been able to write anything for a couple months. When I read something else I can't help getting angry at it for being better than what I can write. Yes, I mad. I mad and jealous and spiteful, and I'm unable to sit down and write anything because of it.

You're advice is to "get over it'. OK, I would love to. How? How does one break out of things like this? How does one take back their mind?
>> No. 105721
>>105705

Heh, a very good question. The mind is a tricky thing, and it doesn't always listen to rhyme or reason. I keep telling myself "Of COURSE I'm not one of the best authors in the fandom. I've been writing fics for two and a half months, for pete's sake." Even if you tell yourself this a billion times, it's tough to get over stress.

One thing I've found out is that working out a bit before writing helps. This gets endorphins going, and I'm usually so tired that I think "You know what, I don't give a shit how many people are better than me. I'm going to write MY story."

Sometimes it's easy to lose sight up where you're currently at in the mountainside of progress, and instead look to the top, a million feet above. It's tempting to think "it's so far away, I should just give up now." One thing that's pushing me is: what if I did give up now? And then, months or years in the future, that's a ton of time wasted that could've been spent getting better.

One step at a time, remember that.

Also, like I said, don't get burned out over writing. Take breaks. Watch a funny show. Find something that makes you laugh. Anything to clear you mind, then get in front of the keyboard and write.

Of course, clearing your mind is the hardest part. Once you learn how to do that, you should be golden.
>> No. 105724
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105724
>>105721
>One thing I've found out is that working out a bit before writing helps. This gets endorphins going, and I'm usually so tired that I think "You know what, I don't give a shit how many people are better than me. I'm going to write MY story."
I think I will try this.

Knowing me, I'll get home and go to sleep afterwards instead.
>> No. 105744
>>105705

Here's what I would do, though this may be hard:

Plan out your next story, start writing, and then stop reading until it's done. I know that giving up reading pony fics is like giving up drugs, but go look at pics on ponibooru or something.

If you can't go that long, do that for two weeks, and write a chapter a day, or so many words a day. After the two weeks, hopefully you'll say that you've sunk so much work into it, that it would hurt more to abandon the story.
>> No. 105749
>>105347

Great advice, man. You put a lot of things out there that I think quite a few people, here and beyond, should consider. Definitely some things in there that a younger self wouldn't hurt to have been aware of.

There's a couple things that I think should be added, though, that kind of ties into "don't compare yourself to others" item, in the theme of social pressures when writing:

Criticism isn't your enemy. And the contrapositive: beware of enablers.

Yeah, criticism can hurt. It doesn't have to be somepony calling your work complete crap for it to hurt. Writing can be a lot of work, and someone coming in and just saying that something needs to be changed isn't bound to make anyone happy. But don't say, "Oh, well, I guess you just don't like it then." I've said that, and more—I'm sure a few people will remember that, and give me flak for showing my face around here again.

The thing about criticism is that it needs to be taken with a grain of salt... and sometimes a cupful... and sometimes a truckload. You have to take the emotional element out of it completely; you can't take it as an attack. You have to boil it down to what's satisfactory, what can be changed, what needs to be fixed, and what should be thrown out. And then you go from there.

Now onto something that's proven to be a bigger threat than critics: enablers. The people who say, "Oh, this is awesome! You're a great writer! Love this story! Don't let anyone tell you any different! :D"

The compliments are great, and can be a good boost when you're feeling low. But don't do what I did, and let it go to your head. Because it just makes you want to say, "Oh, well, I guess you just don't like it then," when you get some real criticism. "All these people like it, so what gives this one guy the right to go and say my work is complete crap?" I've been on the giving and receiving end of this kind of attitude.

The thing here is, you should always be looking to improve. Yeah, trying to please everyone is a fallacy, but why not try for as many as you possibly can? Getting complements out of the skeptics: that's what makes all the work worth while.
>> No. 105954
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105954
Okay guys, I need a bit of advice/help myself. Please forgive me if I sound angsty. I just... need a bit of encouragement. I don't know if I have a unique problem, or if other authors suffer from this.

I will admit, I made my thread for myself as much as anyone else. Ever since I started writing fics, I've been plagued by these problems. Doubt in my abilities, despite the fact that I have two fics on EqD. The constant urge to compare myself to other authors against all instinct. The worry that I'm not doing everything right, even though I know that no piece of writing is perfect.

I know I shouldn't do this, but I keep reading fanfics, and I keep thinking "I wish my style could be like this" or "I wish I wrote this." Which is silly, of course. I have no idea why I insist on torturing myself like this.

Honestly, no matter how hard I try, everyday I'm just thinking about all this stuff. Worrying that I'm not good enough. Worrying that there's something more I need to do, yet I don't know exactly what that is.

Honestly, I'd say this is my biggest problem: I have a crippling desire to create, yet I'm afraid I lack the creativity and open-mindedness to do so. I don't fear that I can't learn; I fear that I lack the capacity to learn. The fic I'm working on right now is supposed to be novel length. Novels require a bunch of scenes strung together in order to get them to flow. Now, in my years of writing (I only started writing consistently a few months ago), I've become used to writing stuff with a serious tone, to get the message out RIGHT AWAY. Obviously, novels require more build up. My problem is, if I'm not writing something I don't think is poignant, it reads flat to me, even if it isn't to the reader. But if I think something is flat, I'm going to think it's bad, and become discouraged.

Novels are also way more complex than short stories, obviously. Lots of characters with different personalities and motivations, things going on in different places... I'm just afraid I'll never be able to grasp how to pull it all off. I have lots of scenes planned for this fic, but not a good idea of how to tie them together, or execute the fine details in the scenes.

It's a difficult feeling to describe, wanting to create something complex, yet fearing that I will never have the tools to be able to do so. It's a constant struggle. My confidence wavers up and down on a daily basis. Every morning, I wake up thinking "You'll never figure it out. You don't have what it takes." Guaranteed. I've been hanging out with my friends a lot, which should take my mind of things, yet nothing can distract from these thoughts.

Then, other times I'll think "You can do it, it'll just take time and the right idea."

No, you can't.

Yes, I can.

On and on and on.

I mean, is writing a novel something that can be learned? Can I somehow get more creative? Or will I always WANT to write a novel, yet be unable to do so? Like I said, that is my biggest fear, and it sucks.

I should take this opportunity to apologize for how melodramatic this all sounds. Yes, I know it's PONY FANFICTION, but I wouldn't be writing all this if it wasn't an actual problem I'm going through. I don't write just because I like ponies, I write because I want to create, to have something to call MY OWN. I write so I can attempt to convey ideas and feelings in a compelling way. This is all I really want.

And again, I'm afraid I lack the creativity and imagination to do this.

So, if anyone has some words of wisdom they'd like to share, I'd greatly appreciate it. Books I could read? Exercises I could do to get my creative juices flowing? A way I could reduce my own standards so I can get some damn writing done?

And more importantly:

HOW TO OUTLINE A NOVEL AND CONSTRUCT SCENES?

Thanks again, /fic. Let the mockery begin ;)
>> No. 105965
>>105954
>Novels are also way more complex than short stories, obviously. Lots of characters with different personalities and motivations, things going on in different places... I'm just afraid I'll never be able to grasp how to pull it all off.
Just as the story builds all those things over time, so do you. The main trick to pulling this off well, is ONE STORY AT A TIME. And I can't emphasize that enough.

>I don't fear that I can't learn; I fear that I lack the capacity to learn.
If you want to increase your capacity to learn, learn how to learn. There is an art to it.

> HOW TO OUTLINE A NOVEL AND CONSTRUCT SCENES?
I am of no help, having never done those things.

That being said, with a novel I've found that instead of deeply setting things in stone, it's better to have a vague idea of what you want ahead, while fleshing out your characters and ideas along the way. I can't even tell you how many times I scrapped an idea I had planned because I felt it didn't really go with what came before it.

>It's a difficult feeling to describe, wanting to create something complex, yet fearing that I will never have the tools to be able to do so. It's a constant struggle. My confidence wavers up and down on a daily basis. Every morning, I wake up thinking "You'll never figure it out. You don't have what it takes." Guaranteed. I've been hanging out with my friends a lot, which should take my mind of things, yet nothing can distract from these thoughts.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iCqwwTfXr1Q
Above is a video on being relentlessly positive by Day9 = 9, professional starcraft caster and all around happiest dude on the planet. (None of the video is about starcraft.) If starcraft ever goes out of style he could write self motivation books for a living.

>Yes, I know it's PONY FANFICTION
Fuck that noise, seriously. Some people can take writing fanfiction lightly, which is great, others of us are writers first and ponies are just our medium. If you are a writer, then never listen to these words and always try your best. You don't improve by half-assing things.

And don't be sad when your best is not enough. I have tried my best at lots of things and failed doing so. The thing about your best is, as long as you are still learning your best does not define you and your best is not static.

I can't count the number of times I have tried my best only to have someone say, "you're complete shit." (Oh league of legends community, never change.)

It's a paradox to strive for other people's approval, yet not care about whether or not you receive it. But that's what I do.
>> No. 106007
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106007
>>105965
>It's a paradox to strive for other people's approval, yet not care about whether or not you receive it. But that's what I do.
This is excellent advice.

I've got nothing to add to that, so have a picture.
>> No. 106023
Thanks, you guys. It really does help, and I'm slowly chipping away at this problem.

Your statement about seeking other's approval raises a couple more issues I'm trying to deal with, mainly relating to not worrying about what others think and everything having to be perfect.

I should take this moment to say that I am a mathematician. I'm used to a more rigid method of thinking, that there's only one way of doing things. In writing, obviously there are many ways to do something, none of which are "right." There are better and worse ways of doing something, but it all depends on the execution. Since I cannot judge my own writing without bias, and because I am overly critical of myself, I kinda need someone to give me a reader response to make sure my writing has meaning. IRL, I tend to be kinda emotionally detached and indifferent. Since I find it tough to get emotionally connected to my characters, writing them effectively is REALLY HARD. I guess this is another worry of mine: that I lack the emotional capacity to write in a compelling way. I have to tackle things more mechanically, then have other people tell me how the characters feel.

So, while it sounds silly, or maybe even like a desperate need for attention, I kinda need reader feedback to make sure everything isn't flat.

You say that I shouldn't feel bad as long as I try my best, but with writing being so complex, with many ways to do things... is trying my best simply writing and being open to feedback? Like I said, I'm trying to write with reduced standards, to experiment a bit. Is this trying my best? I'm only reducing my standards a bit so I can stop being so critical of myself, so I can get some damn writing done and figure out what works. I'm not trying to be shit and throw all concerns of quality out the window.

Well, I gotta run to work, so I'll cut this off here. Thanks again for your help :)
>> No. 106058
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106058
>>105954
>pic

For serious dude, I get you. I've been trying to write my story for a few months now, and I always get the same basic feedback. My plot is cool and interesting. Hell, Richard Nixon said mine was his favorite story he'd reviewed in his thread! But there's one thing: The plot is good, my mechanics aren't.

What sucks is the problem isn't something I can just snap my fingers and fix. I'm told my writing is "flat." I hardly know what that means! Something about not making the important seem important. I do my best, but whenever I REALLY try and get it, I get accused of "Purple Prose." I honestly don't know how to fix it! I thought I did, but then I run into the OTHER bane of my existence: Telling. For some reason, after all these months, I still can't get the hang of that. I try, but I start repeating the same phrases. "Twilight smelled this," "Berry heard that." It just feels awkward to me.

This really kills me, because I REALLY think my story is good. I think I have something to tell that hasn't been told in this fandom yet. The directions I want to take this story will shock a lot of people, I think. But if after all these months of effort and rejection, it's begun to take its toll on me. What If I'm just not good enough to bring my story to life? God, I've lost count of how many times I've rewritten the same four chapters. I desperately want to bring the rest of the story to life, but what's the point if it's all garbage? I don't want to quit, but I don't think my skills are good enough to keep up with my ideas.

tl:dr: I'm emo and too obsessed with making it to EqD.
>> No. 106071
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>>106058
>For some reason, after all these months, I still can't get the hang of that. I try, but I start repeating the same phrases. "Twilight smelled this," "Berry heard that." It just feels awkward to me.
The reason your writing may fall flat or uninteresting is because you're doing something similar to passive voice that kills reader immersion.

Look at these two sentences:

"Twilight smelled the sweet scent of Pinkie Pie's baking floating through the air from the other room."

"The sweet scent of Pinkie Pie's baking floated from the other room."

When passive voice is bad it's because you're focusing on the wrong object (ie, "The ball was thrown by Twilight" should focus on Twilight, because she's more important than the ball.) Filtering out sensations by putting the tag on them, "X smelled/tasted/saw" you are distancing the reader from those sensations. In those cases the reader isn't experiencing them, X is.

Another example to drive the point home:

Bad: "She saw sprawling fields of golden wheat swaying under summer breezes like tides in the ocean."

Good: "Sprawling fields of golden wheat swayed under the summer breeze like ocean tides."
>> No. 106102
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>>105954
There are several things here that I love.

First of all, I love how this board is filled with people from completely opposite ends of the social interaction spectrum. We've got people who will downright insult writers who waste their time with mediocre fics, and we've got people who will come from the outmost humility just asking for some motivation.

Speaking of spectra, I also love how there seems to be no middle ground as far as self-assurance in writing goes. I know a lot of amateur writers, and it's like you're either on top of the world with the will to take it on with a story to tell and the talent to do so, and then, you're sitting alone crying in a corner believing that you have every reason to stay there.

I'm afraid that I don't have any words of wisdom for you, but I wouldn't mind sharing some ways that I use to motivate myself.
One thing that helps me sometimes is this.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ymDj7H4YQkI&list=PL57E5294B859B0EC3&index=35&feature=plpp_video
I don't listen to this for the lyrics, but more for the kind of "pep talk" at both the beginning and the end of the video. Of course, I have no reason to believe that you'll get what I get out of this.

Of course, this simple video is rarely enough. That is why I have a secret weapon:

Envy

In the right conditions, envy can be the most powerful force to ever grace the human psyche. Seriously, by simply observing the admiration given to those who have accomplished what I seek to accomplish, I feel like I've just turned on some sort of high-powered generator in my head. If anything, it's like a writer's high, where my brain zeros in on this one thing and I almost can't think about anything else until I make my descent. The feeling might not be the best, but when I utilize it properly, it's like I'm answering my own prayers.

You've got two fics on EqD? I envy you already.
>> No. 106120
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106120
>>106058

God I hear all of this bro.

My stories aren't new, my first is incredibly cookie cutter and the second is parody. But I think I can write emotion and excitement okay, certainly that's what people have told me anyway...

But my mechanical writing? Big time suckage.

I am the exact same way with the Show/Tell, really, really struggle with it. But I think it's just something you pick up from reading and writing a lot. I dunno, maybe? XD

Bleh, was going to try and give you advice on not being so fixated on "success" and just to enjoy writing but I can't seem to get ir right.

Either way. Know those feels.
>> No. 106190
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http://www.101zenstories.com/index.php?story=19

This is how I think about it.
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