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File 133382701309.jpg - (20.50KB , 500x364 , pinie happy.jpg )
95745 No. 95745
#Discussion #Normal
Looking to write my first fanfic. Any tips for an aspiring writer?
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>> No. 95746
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95746
Always listen to feedback, whether positive or negative. Just don't go taking it all to heart.
>> No. 95748
"Write for yourself; edit for your audience."
>> No. 95749
Be sure that when you write you're writing to improve; you should read your writing back to yourself to catch things like repetitive sentence structure.

A look around the internet will turn up tons of good advice from professional authors, you can't go wrong there.
>> No. 95750
Where would I go to post a fanfic?
>> No. 95752
Read through this thread:
>>30348

And see if anything of those comments help you.
>> No. 95754
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95754
How long are fanfics usually? I'm worried the one I have in mind may be too long.
>> No. 95755
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95755
>>95750
To post anything, try FiMfiction.net.

If you're wanting to get a wider audience, and you think your fanfic is good enough, you can submit to equestriadaily.com. Just go onto the 'submit' link at the top of the page, it'll guide you through the rest.
>> No. 95756
Start writing.

Just start writing. Once you are at a point in the story you are happy with, send it around to a few reviewers.

Don't be offended if they say they don't like it. Take their comments to heart, work to improve...and keep writing.

The only way to get better as a writer is to keep writing, period. Don't be afraid to get judged!
>> No. 95757
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95757
>>95754
It varies. One shots will often be somewhere between 2000 and 12000. Multi-chapter come anywhere from 6000 words to 600000 words.

No fic is too long. Fallout: Equestria, one of the most popular fics in the fandom, is about 60000 words. Though, if you're going to make it really long then it's going to have to be darn good. Readers aren't going to read large mounds of mediocre writing.
>> No. 95758
>>95754

Fanfics can be any length.

One of my favorite fanfics, Two and Two and Two, is under 3,000 words, while the infamous Fallout Equestria is apparently well over 600,000 words, meaning that if it was a novel, it would be the 16th longest novel ever written.

Don't be afraid of length. Write what you need to write.
>> No. 95761
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95761
>>95756

This, and also, enjoy writing. Often, the more care you put into writing, the more you'll enjoy it.
> Cheesy alert.
There's something kind of magical about creating a world from words.
>> No. 95762
>>95761

This. This this this this this this this this this this this this this.

If you're writing a story not because you enjoy it but because you think it'll get you noticed...it probably won't. The best stories are the ones that the writer cares about.
>> No. 95764
>>95756
You know what? This is terrible advice.

That's how I started. That's probably my biggest mistake.

The most important thing about writing, or beginning to write, is to know why you're writing. "I want to write a story where Fluttershy joins the Wonderbolts." That's a "what." But why Fluttershy? Why joining? Why Wonderbolts? I'd argue that even "because this is going to be a challenge" is a valid enough reason, but then again, that's what I like to call "short stories."

Anyway, once you figure out why you're writing what you're writing, work more on defining the specifics. Figure out the conflict of the story. Figure out the resolution. PLAN EVERYTHING. Backstories, histories, cultures, personalities... if you don't have an extensive list of notes and outlines that you're working from, you're doing it wrong.

So no, don't just write. Plan.
>> No. 95765
>>95764
I'm going to disagree. Discovering an ending can be quite fun, and lots of planning can prove to be too much for people. It all depends on what writing process works for each person.
>> No. 95767
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95767
>>95764
I'd say it's somewhere between the two, yet it really depends on the person. I find that sometimes I have an idea, start writing, and the thing just sorta grows. Other times, even with ideas I've planned well, it just doesn't work out and I abandon it.

It's about knowing what works for you. If you're naturally an artsy type who has whole worlds open up just by the idea of a blank canvas, you can probably freestyle it. If you're naturally an analytic type, extensive planning will do you a world of good.

Though, the longer the story, the more notes you're going to need.
>> No. 95768
>>95767
Outlining helps, though, regardless of which way you're going about it. Either way, you're still writing a story. It's just that the story outline has less bells and whistles.
>> No. 95769
What about formatting? I've beenusing Microsoft Word, but I often see fanfics using Google Docs. Is that a better option?
>> No. 95771
>>95764

I'd say that the best answer actually lies somewhere between our two ideas, actually.

Taking the time to plan out a story - knowing what points you want to hit, knowing what message you want to say - those are extremely important. The story I'm writing, I'll admit, I didn't just start writing...I had a lot of planning go into it.

But equally important is just getting in there and fleshing out your story. You know what points you want to hit, you know where you want to go, but the planning will never be enough to encompass every word, every scene, every detail. Once you start writing, that is when the full story comes together.

For example, the story I'm currently writing (Smiling Flowers) had a lot of planning go into it...but when I began writing, things changed drastically. Entire plot points disappeared, and other points came into my mind, just based on how the story was flowing, and the ideas that came to me as the words appeared.

So, yeah. Finding a balance between "Plan out your message" and "Get in there and start writing" is something each writer has to figure out for themselves.
>> No. 95774
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95774
>>95769
It's practical for most people. Anyone who has the link can open it from anywhere, plus people can add comments if you let them. It just allows the file to be shared with reviewers, prereaders, kaybe your audience etc.
>> No. 95776
>>95769
No one or at least, almost no one is willing to risk viruses from downloading a .doc file. Google Docs and FiMFiction and dA are used because there's no downloading of anything required besides loading the webpage.
>> No. 95777
>>95757
The one I have in mind is pretty long. Should I try to write a different, shorter story to test out my writing skills? I dont want to, like you said, publish large chunks of mediocre writing.
>> No. 95778
>>95769
If you don't have a constant Internet connection, Microsoft Word is probably the best option. LibreOffice is acceptable if you don't have MS Word, and you should only use OpenOffice if you haven't heard of LibreOffice.

Google Docs is great for working on files in a review/revision/editing perspective. The only real problems I have are the compatability issues with .ODTs or .DOCXs that are written in LibreOffice or MS Office (respectively), their wonky-at-best spellchecking, some general formatting issues, and the lack of em dashes.

However, keep in mind that Google Docs also has the ability to showcase your work more easily and safely, so the fact that you see it often doesn't necessarily mean that everyone COMPLETELY wrote that story in Google Docs.

Honestly, compared to the hassle it is of dealing with version control of offline documents, if I had a choice, I'd deal exclusively in Google Docs. I don't have Internet access on my writing computer (a blessing and a curse), though, so I use LibreOffice for "offline writing" and Google Docs for "Online Writing."
>> No. 95780
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95780
>>95777
If you want to write it, write it. You may find it useful to write something shorter first, but it's not guaranteed. If you want to improve, just make a conscious effort to do so. There's quite a lot of long fanfics in the fandom that have done well in which it's quite apparent that the author's improved massively in ability between the beginning and the end. Find a good reviewer who's willing to read through your work and go for it.
>> No. 95783
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95783
Thanks everyone! This is actually my first time on Ponychan, so thanks for the warm reception.
>> No. 95784
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95784
>>95783
Glad we could help. :)
>> No. 95785
Feel free to keep posting any advice that may come up or not. I wont force you.. I will try to check back often.
>> No. 95800
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95800
Wouldn't this fit better in the Story Forge?
>> No. 95801
>>95800
the thread? oh, well, as you can see i'm new here, so i didnt know there was a board for this kind of topic.
>> No. 95803
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95803
>>95801
Well, that's why you read the sticky >_>.
>> No. 95804
>>95803
> You're on vacation yet you still seem to be on Ponychan?
>> No. 95806
>>95804
Sturm is always watching, always.
>> No. 95810
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95810
>>95804
Finished skiing an hour ago.

>>95806
Pretty much, yeah.
>> No. 95811
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95811
>>95748
And again I'm reminded of this one:

"Write Drunk. Edit sober." - Ernest Hemmingway.

Also... Take a break from Fanfiction to read literary classics once in a while. I'm totally overdue for it, and I have a pile by my bedside that begins with Steinbeck's The Red Pony. I wish I had time to join the SS&E editing dogpile, but I've decided that instead of dredging through Dredgmane so I can jump on that bandwagon, I'm going to read non-pony for a while.
http://bit.ly/IbyGqa
>> No. 95813
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95813
>>95810
What would you do without the internet?

>>95811
This makes me feel guilty because I should currently be transversing the magical world of Atlas Shrugged. My only contention is that it's crap. :(

On topic... I got nothing.
>> No. 95814
keep updates in short intervals, followers get angry
>> No. 95816
You will look back at it months later and realize it's merely good, so don't expect to write a masterpiece your first time out.

Your goal is to become familiar with your muse. Some work best with plans, some improvise. I'm a combination of the two, but lean towards improvisation (I think). You'll probably need to come to terms with the darker sides of your creativity as well - a lot of first fics are heavy on the racy or violent content for this reason.

(They're usually pretty bad. But good isn't your goal yet.)

The number one thing to remember, I think, is to be eager to spoil the story to yourself, then write towards that goal. Vonnegut put it as "begin at the end." Then, when you make it back to the first thing to go wrong, you have your story.

The number two thing: slow down in a scene to imagine the details. You shouldn't include them all, but you'd be amazed how much a story comes alive when you start to get this right. (Seeing this happen in the writing of others is my favorite part of reviewing.)
>> No. 95819
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95819
>>95803
Like I said, I'm new here, so I dont actually know what a sticky is.
>> No. 95820
>>95819
lol

I'ts the post at the top of the page with those shiny red letters that say: please read before posting.
>> No. 95822
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95822
>>95813
Then read something different.

>>95816
LISTEN TO THIS GUY, everyone. This is sound advice, especially "don't expect a masterpiece." Be reasonable with yourself and set small, achievable goals at first.

I made the mistake of having literary delusions of grandeur. It took the sagely wisdom of Samurai Jack Anon to straighten me out: "As far as I can see you have great vision, but then you stumble in the planning for no other reason than you lack the necessary tools. You can't run without walking first, Demetrius, and regardless of actual quality of the story or not, I think you are trying to fly."
>> No. 95824
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95824
>>95820
lol, Thanks for helping the noob out!
>> No. 95825
>>95820
lol, Thanks for helping the noob out!
>> No. 95826
>>95825
and I posted twice...all part of the plan...
>> No. 95827
>>95813
on the topic of Atlas Shrugged (and completely off topic of this thread, lol) i am currently reading that as well.Love it.
>> No. 95828
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95828
>>95778
>and the lack of em dashes.
Actually, Gdocs has em-dashes, it's just a minor adventure to find them. Go to Insert, Special Characters, change the left drop-down bar to Punctuation, then the right drop-down to Dash/Connector, then select the Em-Dash icon. Once you have one on your document, you can just copy/paste it instead of going through that process again (for the life of me I don't know how to use the hex shortcut function :/ ).
>> No. 95829
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95829
>>95827
Really, how far in are you?
>> No. 95834
>>95829
Just midway through the third and final part. Just after everything that happened on Scudder's radio show.
>> No. 95838
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95838
>>95834
I'm near the beginning I'm afraid. Only just got to the point where Dagny and Rearden did the nasty for the first time.
What do you like about it so much?
> Probably won't read this thread again 'til morning now.
>> No. 95840
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95840
>>95838
I think obviously, Ayn Rand's philosophies are a bit extreme, but the basic cncept is a very interesting one, that man is beholden only to himself. Also, I just love the characters. Dagny and Rearden are fantastic and people like James are such fantastic foils.
>> No. 95891
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95891
>>95828
Or ALT-0151 should work in most apps. I have a bit of an em-dash fetish, so that shortcut is second nature to me by now.

>>95811
>Looks up from his appletini.
Am I allowed to retroactively credit all my druken writing sessions to this quote?

>>95777
Well, hmm. Conventional wisdom does say that you should start small, test the waters, don't overreach your limits (especially before you know them), and ESPECIALLY don't start something you don't intend to see through to the bitter end (understanding full and well just how many manhours may be required, if you're planning some epic yarn).

That said, I personally chose to ignore all those warnings. Equestria Daily was holding a writing competition back in Sept. I was smitten by a crossover idea, and couldn't really find anyone else running with it at the time. So I jumped in face-first. I was aware of all the above points, but at the time, no other story concepts tickled my fancy, and I didn't want to half-ass a story that I didn't have my heart set on. I doubt I would have ever gotten into the fanfic community if I hadn't started this particular story.

So, was it worth it? Well, it got me to start writing, as I said. I've also become inspired by more story prompts; haven't published them yet, but it's giving me more grounds to practice and experiment. And I got published on EqD, so there's that. On the flip side, now that I'm ~70k words into my story, my earlier chapters looked downright cringe-worthy to me, to the point where I'm applying some heavy edits. Which then begs the nagging thought, "How many potential readers did I lose because my writing chops weren't strong enough yet?" A one-shot can at least gather dust in your portfolio. If you lose a reader in Ch1 of a multi-part, it's doubtful they'll give you a second chance on your later chapters.

TL;DR? I got nothing. The best you can do is weigh the pros and cons, and make up your own mind.
>> No. 95917
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95917
>>95840
It's not the philosophy, it's just the sheer fact that every protagonist seems to be a cheap, one dimensional characterisation of her philosophy. Also, the book's just so preachy, to the point of being annoying. The dry writing style really had me going, but after about 300 pages and with another 900 to go, it's starting to grate at me. Oh yeah, and the book keeps reaching points where it feels like it's ending, only for the things just to get worse. The only reason I'm still reading is because I want to know 'Who is John Galt?'
> Darn Ayn Rand and her insistence on having a good hook.
>> No. 95921
Don't write for attention. That's the best advice I can think of. Write because you want your story to exist, because the act of writing excites you and because you can't not write. If you write for attention, you will be disappointed.

Write for yourself as a reader. Write stories you would like to read if you hadn't written them. Avoid laziness and overindulgence in your whims.

Never call yourself a good writer. Be humble. Don't bend over backwards to accommodate everything loud fans and critics say, but do take criticism into consideration. Even harshly worded criticism that makes you want to curl up into a ball and cry can be valuable and will improve your writing.

Don't be scared of grammar, spelling and punctuation. Answers to your questions are a Google search away (or you could check out my guide (shill, shill) http://derpy.me/EznGuide)

On the subject of multipart stories that you write and release serially: don't release something you're unhappy with for the sake of a self-imposed schedule. Take the time you need. I'd also encourage making updates as meaty and filling as possible. That way, even if they don't come around too often, they'll be worth the reader's while when they do arrive.

Em dash is Alt+0151. En dash is Alt+0150.

My favourite writing tool at the moment is WriteMonkey (http://www.writemonkey.com). There's no formatting and no menus; it's just you and your text. I like to make the background black and the text giant green Courier New. I also turn on the typewriter sound effect and listen to that satisfying ticka-tick as I happily type away.
>> No. 95943
>typewriter sound effect
If you have the money, splurge on a mechanical keyboard. (I have an IBM Model M and a Razer BlackWidow.) It's the difference between a real camera and the cheesy "click" effect on a camera phone. They also feel a lot better, in my opinion.
>> No. 95947
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95947
>>95943
Choc Mini w/ MX Browns here~

Thinking about a Corsair K90 because I'm a dirty Corsair fanboy...
>> No. 95956
>>95943
Kinesis Advantage to the max.

>>95921
This is more awesome advice. Your motives for writing will surely find you out and make writing a joy or misery for you. I feel a little dead inside whenever preoccupied with how the fic might be received. Just last night I tried writing again (a short story) just as an exercise, since it had been so long and it felt seemly to exhume my muse. I left it angrily because instead of simply reworking the plot when I found holes, I heard nagging voices of readers and got bogged down with frustration.
>> No. 95958
>>95956
Story of my life.
>> No. 95961
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95961
>>95943
I've got a Razer Blackwidow. It's nice, I guess. It's a step-up from the standard, but I don't feel any issue typing on other keyboards. I frequently toggle between my laptop's cheap keyboard and my desktop's and don't bother about the differences. (Full disclosure: I switch to my laptop when housemates are lurking about. I hide my fanfiction like porn.)

As far as typesetting is concerned, using LyX (or LaTeX) is great because it doesn't let you have bad things like empty environments and double spaces between words. Everything is very restricted so that you can focus on what's really important—the words themselves. Apostrophes always set to little 6's, single-quotes and double-quotes work as intended (facing the word they're nesting), and dashes can be inserted with a series of hyphens (-- becomes – on export; --- becomes —). Indentation and paragraph spacing is all automated with normal printing standards. The final product always looks stellar because LaTeX is as sexy as a Russian library, and if you want to publish to Fimfiction, well, I've got scripts for that. Heh-heh.
>> No. 95966
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95966
>>95917
Now, I have to (respectfully, of course) disagree with you for the one dimensional characters thing. Especially after the entire backstory with Dagny and Francisco. And I think you'll find a lot more depth in Dagny's and Rearden's characters as the story goes on from where you are. Although I do agree that the John Galt thing was a good hook.
>> No. 95968
Read, read, and read some more!

Great place to find fics that show you what to do. Equestriadaily.com
Great place to find really bad and really good fics,
Fimfiction.net
>> No. 95969
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95969
>>95966
I really hope so, at this rate I'm going to have to create an interdimensional wormhole in order to travel there and strangle them.
>> No. 95975
>>95969
You mentioned a fanfic called Fallout Equestria. What is it about, and is it any good?
>> No. 95978
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95978
>>95975
http://www.equestriadaily.com/2011/04/story-fallout-equestria.html
Debatably the best fic in the fandom. It's a crossover with the game Fallout but is written in such a way that no knowledge of the game is needed to enjoy the fic. I've never played Fallout yet enjoyed this immensely.
Pretty serious stuff but has its good share of funny moments. Nice characterisation and plot make this a good read.
>> No. 95979
>>95975

It's quite good, fairly violent, but good. There's a video game about morally-dark social experiments and the world after total nuclear war, hence "Fallout." Fo:E is that with magical ponies and F/F shipping.
>> No. 95981
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95981
>>95978
I'll be sure to take a look when I have the time!
>>95979
I already know (somewhat) about Fallout. I am a huge gamer, but I never got around to Fallout. Always intended to, though. It'll be interesting to see the ponies in a nuclear wasteland. Is it in the Capitol Wasteland or New Vegas?
>> No. 95983
>>95981
It's in Equestria. One of the rare, good crossovers where the author actually blended the two universes and made something new instead of pasting ponies into Fallout.
>> No. 95984
>>95981
The main story (Kkat's) is similar in tone to Fallout 3, but it borrows from all the games -- a pony version of the Master is one of the major villains. Littlepip adventures around a lot (Appleloosa, Canterlot, Fillydelphia, fallen Cloudsdale, Manehattan), but her Stable is the Ponyville one.
>> No. 95995
>>95981
Just make sure have a lot of spare time, it's really, really long.
>> No. 96000
>>95978
Very debatable, but it is one of the best. Personally I recomend Pretty in Pink, everypony says read My Little Dashie for a sad story. But it's a complete waste of time. Pretty in Pink is a really good and sad story, link.
http://www.fimfiction.net/story/455/1/Pretty-in-Pink/Pretty-in-Pink
>> No. 96002
>>95995
If I find the time to read Atlas Shrugged, I think I can find the time to take a look.
>> No. 96012
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96012
>>96002
I am only a few pages in and I already love it! (turns out I'm easy to please).
>> No. 96014
>>96012
This guy(or girl) even added footnotes for when the pony levels up? this guy thought of everything!
>> No. 96016
>>95961
>single-quotes and double-quotes work as intended (facing the word they're nesting)
I agree with the use of LaTeX for writing, but don't you have to make quotes manually (ie: use `` instead of " for the opening mark) to get it to face the correct direction?
>> No. 96087
>>96016
With LaTeX, yes. With LyX, no.
>> No. 96300
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96300
Is there any real method to tell whether your style is any good or not?

Whenever I try to write, I feel at first like my diction is largely competent and occasionally even eloquent. However, after I step away from what I've written for a day or so, everything invariably looks like crap, and I get discouraged and get away from my writing for even longer. But then when I look at it again after a longer time, my writing doesn't seem as bad as my previous assessment had indicated.

So how do I know which of my evaluations is more likely to reflect that of an average reader?

And: how much of style is a product of the revising stages, and how much is typically already in the initial draft? Is it common to write drafts in dry prose and revise them into floridness, or is it more common to draft purple prose and trim the fat in revising?
>> No. 96317
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96317
>>96300
> And: how much of style is a product of the revising stages, and how much is typically already in the initial draft?
I think this probably depends on the writer. I take large amounts of time on getting style just write the first time round, and then second time round is mainly polishing, shining, and often rewriting large sections.

> Is it common to write drafts in dry prose and revise them into floridness, or is it more common to draft purple prose and trim the fat in revising?
This is interesting. Mine's generally the second. What about everyone else?
>> No. 96407
>>96317
>>96300
> And: how much of style is a product of the revising stages, and how much is typically already in the initial draft? Is it common to write drafts in dry prose and revise them into floridness, or is it more common to draft purple prose and trim the fat in revising?

Depends on the writer, the story, and how long you put between drafts. By the third or fourth draft, you should probably be doing both.

Some stories have to be reorganized to be more intuitive. Some sections need more detail to increase their importance. Some scenes need to be downplayed, because they don't work as well with other scenes through various revisions.

Your style can change over a period of time as well. So the story you started with can become an entirely different project after a few months. But then you can always go back and revise your outline too.
>> No. 96932
File 133442796568.png - (122.94KB , 833x959 , rainbow dash thinking.png )
96932
Anyone know what OOC is? I've seen it in reviews, but I don't actually know what that is.
>> No. 96933
>>96932

OoC means "Out of character."
>> No. 97131
What do you do when you are freaking out like a chicken even if you know failing is not important? I am right now in my fifth version of a story I'm writing and then I get panic attacks about it sucking, erase it all and then begin again from scratch.

I don't know, is there something against that? Do I need to plan more? Should I read more books?
>> No. 97143
>>97131
I suggest first of all to chill, and take a break from writing for a spell. Sounds to me like you're a bit burnt out. Stress can be murder on a writer's focus, so just chill a while, and when your head's clear try again.

And one other thing: Stop it. Panicking over your story sucking means you're too worried about what other people will think of it, and while it's natural for a writer to have such worries you seem to be doing it too much. So if you're feeling the pain, hey dude, refrain. It's all good :)
>> No. 97144
>>97131
I suggest first of all to chill, and take a break from writing for a spell. Sounds to me like you're a bit burnt out. Stress can be murder on a writer's focus, so just chill a while, and when your head's clear try again.

And one other thing: Stop it. Panicking over your story sucking means you're too worried about what other people will think of it, and while it's natural for a writer to have such worries you seem to be doing it too much. So if you're feeling the pain, hey dude, refrain. It's all good :)
>> No. 97156
Keep all your drafts. You don't have to look at them, but keep them.

Try drafting on paper. I think it helps me.

Write stupid little scenes. Heck, wrote "Pinkie Pie threatens to castrate some cop a la Fight Club" just for the heck of it.

Oh, and those who can't, review. Ach. It's later than I should be up. Time to just key in a scene I wrote longhand and call it a night.
>> No. 97162
Don't be afraid of taking risks. Go to the levels of writing that can make people shout. In fact, that's what viewers love.

For example, if you're writing a story with an OC, make the viewers care about him. Once a relationship has been established, write an unexpected turn such as making him attack Celestia / Luna.
>> No. 97599
>>97162

>Don't be afraid of taking risks. Go to the levels of writing that can make people shout. In fact, that's what viewers love.

That's BS, and you are lying to the new writers that may be reading this. Stop that.

Readers don't want to see something novel and truly inventive. Some may say that they do, but their actions indicate otherwise. A VAST majority just want to read a story that either 1) sustains their desired emotional state or 2) supports their personal opinions on matters they find important. A genuinely original work wouldn't accomplish either of those things, and it would get reactions ranging from mocking insults to ignoring it completely.

My advice to new writers: If you go out and try to do something new, you'll just get disappointed. Look at what is popular now, and pick a flavor of it that you find interesting, then put a tiny "new" twist on it. Sadly, that is the best you're going to get with entertaining readers with original content.
>> No. 97601
>>97162

>Don't be afraid of taking risks. Go to the levels of writing that can make people shout. In fact, that's what viewers love.

That's BS, and you are lying to the new writers that may be reading this. Stop that.

Readers don't want to see something novel and truly inventive. Some may say that they do, but their actions indicate otherwise. A VAST majority just want to read a story that either 1) sustains their desired emotional state or 2) supports their personal opinions on matters they find important. A genuinely original work wouldn't accomplish either of those things, and it would get reactions ranging from mocking insults to ignoring it completely.

My advice to new writers: If you go out and try to do something new, you'll just get disappointed. Look at what is popular now, and pick a flavor of it that you find interesting, then put a tiny "new" twist on it. Sadly, that is the best you're going to get with entertaining readers with original content.
>> No. 97602
>>97601

Both these motherfuckers are wrong.

Follow your heart. Write what's going to flow from your fingers. Then learn how to make that writing technically good. Take your awful self-insert shipping clopfic, find someone who's willing to give you honest help instead of asking you to kindly throw your computer out the window for what you just wrote, and see what they have to say about your actual style and execution.

"Most readers want to read what supports them on XYZ" but most writers make fics because they want to explore their headcanon that says X or Y or Z. "Readers want you to take risks and blow them away with something crazy" but most writers only take risks when they have an idea that THEY think is exciting and interesting.

It's about learning.
>> No. 97616
>>97602

The notion of "First and foremost you need to write for yourself" is a wonderful one, but it's only an ideal. We all write for ourselves, but then we usually want to share it with others. If we're being honest with ourselves then we have to admit that we ARE writing (at least a little bit) for the readers. Otherwise, why bother to share our stories at all?

You can only keep the idealistic attitude up for so long before reality hits you. Then you realize the inventive and new creation you've put together doesn't matter one wink if no one is seeing it. Sure you have learned from it, but what then? What will the lessons you've learned matter, if no one will look at your work long enough to see them applied?

Also: New authors should have google search open on a minimized web browser for spell checking purposes. It's handy for researching too, in case you need to look up a name or historical date or whatever.
>> No. 97651
>>97616

Writing just for yourself isn't the best way to garner attention, no, but it is the best way to learn. There's nothing inherently wrong with compromising your vision in favor of something that'll be more appealing to readers, but it should always be a compromise, not total capitulation.

We can't all write the next Fallout: Equestria. We could all write the next Conversion Bureau, but then we would all be shitty writers.

Giving a new writer advice on how to get noticed is ass fucking backwards. New writers should want to write better things, not more popular things.
>> No. 97655
Try looking at real published books - look at how they do it. Then try to do it like that, but put your own style into it.
>> No. 97667
On writing for yourself:
In an earlier post, I said this:
"Write for yourself as a reader. Write stories you would like to read if you hadn't written them. Avoid laziness and overindulgence in your whims."

So yes, there is a balance, but at the end of it, you should still be writing for yourself. Most of your ideas probably won't be bizarre enough for others to not get them at all, and if you're writing them in a way that's incomprehensible to anyone but you (and intend to show it to others), then yeah, you're doing something wrong. Considering how others will react to your work starts with you thinking about how you would react to it in their position. So that's why you need to avoid self-insert wish fulfillment, any kind of over-the-top, benefit-less self-indulgence (like being overly pretentious for no good reason) and laziness at any point of the writing process. If you're writing just to write, you might not proofread, or you might skip/rush/gloss over important scenes and details. If you're writing with an eye to how your work will be read, you'll avoid a lot of that.

When you're writing My Little Pony fanfiction on the internet, the most important thing you can do is make sure you have a good time doing it, and that comes from writing about things you care about and ideas that interest you. I wouldn't waste my time rehashing the flavour of the day just for views, because that would be a really dull use of my free time, and how important are views anyway? Certainly not something that matters enough for me to spend precious leisure time slaving over anything my heart isn't in.

That said, I think there's a growing misconception about the gap between what you like and what your audience likes. It's really not so wide that you have to sell out and write something boring and soulless to get any attention, and most of you are not weird enough that a story you care about will appeal to no-one but you. Writing for yourself and getting attention for it doesn't have to be an all-or-nothing tradeoff, and indeed, being the next big writer with work you're passionate about is a much better feeling than being one with work that you wrote solely for attention.

So in the end, my advice is to write something you care about, but also to proofread, to write it with an eye to how it will be read, and to take criticism gracefully (and gratefully) and use it to improve.
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